Galveston hospital flooded by Hurricane Ike cuts 3800 staff

Flooding at UTMB after Hurricane IkeIke

Galveston, TEXAS –

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Still struggling to recover from Hurricane Ike, the battered economy of Galveston Island has suffered another severe blow with the decision by the University of Texas to lay off 3,800 people next week from the medical center, the largest employer on the island. [end of excerpt]

If you’ve been following the Project417 Hurricane Ike Relief updates here, you know we have another trip planned soon to return to Galveston County to help with the recovery efforts.  Many people have asked me, “What’s it like down there Andy?”, or have commented something like, “it’s lucky the U.S. is such a wealthy developed country, they can take care of their own after a disaster”.

Galveston University of Texas Medical Branch during the hurricane

Galveston University of Texas Medical Branch during the hurricane

I hope some of these photos from the University of Texas Medical Center at Galveston, will give you some perspective on the scope of the hurricane damage in Texas – specifically in Galveston County and Galveston Island.  How soon do you think Toronto General or Sick Kids would be business as normal following flooding on this scale?

How would the economy of Mississauga be affected by the lay-off of over three thousand people at Trillium or Credit Valley Hospital?

The re-building and recovery efforts in Galveston are a huge undertaking – and for the ordinary family, there is no insurance coverage to replace their homes. Often the FEMA grants available will cover only a small percentage of the costs needed to re-build a damaged or destroyed home. Then there are all the other costs like temporary housing, job loss due to business closures, replacing entire contents submerged by the flood: Fridge, stove, washer, dryer, beds, furniture, clothing, computers, A/C, TV’s and stereos – all your worldly possessions. The efforts of volunteers, to help with a multitude of tasks related to re-building, repair and renovation, are priceless, and often are the only means of less affluent families to even begin the recovery process.

We're collecting money for this Galveston County family to help rebuild their home.

We're collecting money for this Galveston County family to help rebuild their home.

So join us for the next trip, contact us here by posting a comment. Consider making a donation to cover the cost of the trip and the purchase of tools and building materials from local suppliers in Texas to be donated to the families most in need.

Support Project417, help the homeless Hurricane Ike victims, make a differenc

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