Christmas Eve 2009 – Special Events

Christmas Holy Night Star of Bethlehem - Jesus Christ is born

O’ Holy Night

Suddenly, an angel of the Lord appeared among them, and the radiance of the Lord’s glory surrounded them. They were terrified, but the angel reassured them. “Don’t be afraid!” he said. “I bring you good news that will bring great joy to all people. The Savior— yes, the Messiah, the Lord — has been born today in Bethlehem, the city of David!


Thank-you to all my readers of the Missonlog blog.  Hope you all have a blessed Christmas and joyous New Year! –

<>< Andy Coats

Follow me  @canayjun on Twitter

Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward everyone.

::

Galaxy

homelessness homeless #whyhomeless

home-less

What is a Sandwich Run?

Have a real conversation with our friends.A sandwich run is simply volunteers delivering nutritious bag lunches to homeless street people by walking well travelled routes in the downtown area where street people live.  It is a relational outreach – a grassroots community activity – in addition to delivering a meal to a hungry person, hopefully dialogue will occur and bridges of trust strengthened.

Here at Project417 Ekklesia Inner City Minsitries, we’ve been facilitating sandwich runs for almost twenty years. The main focus of the ministry is not simply delivering food to hungry street people. The key factor is communication through conversations with our friends on the street. We don’t try to be experts or counselors, rather we try to help our volunteers – ordinary people – engage with the homeless. This is true community demonstrated by the caring act of delivering a meal.

Anyone can volunteer with us by invitation after taking part in our orientation presented by experienced team leaders. Find out how truly liberating this volunteer experience can be – to step outside your personal comfort zone and meet our homeless friends on their own grounds.

Many churches have taken up “sandwich runs” in Toronto as a favorite activity for youth groups. But in their eagerness to provide an experience for their own youth, they overlook the deeper needs of the homeless they want to help. They focus on quantity, not quality – the sandwich runs become a mad dash around the city dropping bag lunches with as many homeless as possible, often even without asking the recipient simply ” Would you like a bag lunch?” I encounter these groups all the time, often as many as thirty or forty teens or younger children often accompanied by only a single adult. It becomes their charitable duty, rather than a ministry to reach people. While our friends on the street often tell us that they are encouraged by seeing the young people, and are thankful for the food, how can they be expected to engage in meaningful dialogue with someone who is fifteen or younger?  They crave mature discourse.  It would be wonderful to see more adults on sandwich runs – people who our street friends can relate to, and can understand some of the uniquely adult challenges they face such as family break-ups, job loss, abuse, addictions, psychological distress, relationship issues and so on.

Furthermore, these well meaning church groups are actually putting the safety of their youth at risk in not partnering with an inner city organization that provides experience, guidance and street saftey for their groups. I’ve actually seen church groups of dozens of children being herded by a single adult through Crack Central in Toronto with boxes of lunches and attempting to give lunches to dealers engaged in drug transactions. Not everyone on the streets, or in the parks of Toronto is homeless, or friendly and safe. I regularily encounter sleeping homeless people on street corners with more than a dozen bag lunches and other sundry styrofoam food trays piled up by their head or feet, obviously dropped there by an inexperienced group. And I doubt whether even one of them was prepared to check if that sleeping person was actually still breathing, or would know what to do if they discovered the person were in some physical distress.

I’ve had self-important church elders and youth pastors tell me “We’re doing God’s work and are under the divine protection of Jesus Christ”.  Christ doesn’t promise us safety from harm – on the contrary, He guarantees us conflict and confrontation if we follow Him in his work. It is wise to be prepared. At Project417 Ekklesia, we take that seriously. The safety of our groups is paramount, as is the effectiveness of our ministry to the homeless. Come on out and join us. Full details and calendar online at http://project417.com/sandwich

Leadership vs. Teamwork

Grunt work - getting your hands dirty.Sunday is a great day to reflect and, if you’re lucky, to be inspired. I got lucky yesterday and heard a great message by our Pastor, Joe Elkerton, at the Bloor Lansdowne Christian Fellowship. It was on leadership.

It made me think how our society is so focused on “leadership” but seems to forget what really makes things work – service. Everyone wants to be a great leader but we’ve all forgotten how to get any real work done. Who does the grunt work? Who gets their hands dirty?

A quick search on Google turns up 185 million results for leadership and only 22.5 million for teamwork. (less than 5% of the sites dealing with teamwork were related to the church or Christianity) How are we getting any work done? Well, the answer is simple – We’re not. As a society we have a fixation with celebrity and stardom. Not just in sports and entertainment, but in politics, government, business and public works. We think it is great leaders who accomplish great works. I don’t think this is exclusively a characteristic of Western society but it seems to have been taken to the extreme here in North America.

Marshall McLuhan said, “The medium is the message”. (Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, 1964) Basically that the media influence and even overshadow the messages or information being delivered to us. Those media have changed drastically since McLuhan coined the phrase. Not just print, radio, film or television, now the internet and video hold the place of preeminence with a host of new delivery technologies – on-demand, podcasts, mobile messaging, streaming video, HD-DVD, HDTV, MP3, iTunes, P2P, satellite, Twitter,  Facebook. A raging torrent of information roars to capture our attention and the primary means the agents of delivery utilize to achieve this is still that old Hollywood magic act – the “Star”.

In 1968 artist Andy Warhol said, ” In the future, everyone will be world-famous for fifteen minutes” which has morphed into our idea of 15 seconds of fame. Warhol was reading the pulse of evolving media delivery and how it shaped society around us. It is mirrored in U.S. presidential races. We’ve just seen the Obama – Clinton parade go by for the democratic nomination and now we will witness the the most stupendous circus act of all – Who will be the next president of the United States? Barack Obama or John McCain? All of the world shaping issues that affect the daily lives of every person on the planet will be distilled down to into some live streaming version of American Idol. I wouldn’t be suprised to see some future election decided by voters texting their choice to a five digit number from their cellphone.

This is leadership miscontrued. The personal glorification raised above the interests of the public good. And we all want it for ourselves. We want to be leaders, we want to be stars, we want to be famous, if only for fifteen minutes. As a matter of fact, we want this so much that many of us choose infamy rather than obscurity. Ask any corporate public relations person and they’ll tell you “even bad press is good publicity”.

In the workplace, in school, in the public shere, we all want to lead (or think we should). Very few are willing to serve and follow. The church is not immune. Perhaps it is even more susceptible to the star making machinery. Witness the excesses visited upon Christians everywhere hungry to cozy up to the next prophet, looking for their share of the fame. How many churches hold leadership seminars?

No really great leader in the bible asked for the job. Rather they were called from positions of service. As a matter fo fact, like Moses or Jonah, they tried to decline the calling.  We need to do the same. Rather than seeking for opportunities to use our skills to lead others, we need to seek opportunites to serve. We need to get our hands dirty, even when there’s no one recording the moment on camera to post photos on Facebook. Pick up the garbage, sweep out the corners, carry the burden, bind the wounds, offer the cool drink of water. Join the team. It already has a captain, coach and superstar – Jesus Christ.

%d bloggers like this: